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Shipping container design criteria in container home – Dimension
  • 09 Jun 2017


The series prepared by Modo Container will consist of four articles in total. This is the first, dimension. Will follow foundation, structural system, infill system.


Cargo container homes have become increasingly popular around the world in the last 30 years. Because cargo containers are modular in design, they can be used to create efficient, cheap homes. Repurposing cargo containers into homes is a sustainable construction practice due to the majority of the structure coming from recycled materials. Many design parameters of cargo container homes parallel those of standard home construction methodologies (cold formed steel framing/light wood framing) and from a structural standpoint, cargo containers are an effective building material.


The cargo container is an appealing construction material for a variety of reasons. First, their strength and durability provide both structural support and a long life span. Their weathering steel construction provides not only corrosion protection, but also strength. Also, with a movement toward sustainable construction practices, the recycling of unused cargo containers for construction material puts an unused product to use. Also, the cargo containers modular construction simplifies the design process. Much like bricks or CMU, cargo containers are designed to specific standards. Table below lists the dimensions of the standard sized containers.


Typical Dimensions


Exterior

Interior

Door Opening


Length

Width

Height

Length

Width

Height

Width

Height

10′ Standard Dry Container

10′

8′

8’6″

9’3″

7’8″

7′ 9 7/8″

7’8″

7’5″

20′ Standard Dry Container

20′

8′

8’6″

19’3″

7’8″

7′ 9 7/8″

7’8″

7’5″

40′ Standard Dry Container

40′

8′

8’6″

39′ 5″

7’8″

7′ 9 7/8″

7’8″

7’5″

40′ High Cube Dry Container

40′

8′

9’6″

39′ 5″

7’8″

8′ 10″

7’8″

8′ 5 1/2″

45′ High Cube Dry Container

45′

8′

9’6″

44′ 5″

7’8″

8′ 10″

7’8″

8′ 5 1/2″

20′ Refrigerated Container

19′ 10.5″

8′

8’6″

17′ 11″

7’6″

7’6″*

7”5″

7’3″

40′ Refrigerated Container

40′

8′

8’6″

37′ 11″

7’6″

7’6″*

7”6″

7’6″

40′ High Cube Refrigerated Container

40′

8′

9’6″

37′ 11″

7’6″

8’4″*

7”6″

8’4″

Typical Weights / Capacity


Cubic Capacity

Tare Weight

Max Gross

Max Payload

20′ Standard Dry Container

1,165 cu. ft.

5,050

67,200

62,150

40′ Standard Dry Container

2,350 cu. ft.

8,000

67,200

59,200

40′ High Cube Dry Container

2694 cu. ft.

8,775

67,200

58,425

45′ High Cube Dry Container

3043 cu. ft.

9,810

72,800

62,990

20′ Refrigerated Container

1,010 cu. ft. (967)**

6,503

52,800

46,407

40′ Refrigerated Container

2,051 cu. ft. (1959)**

9,700

67,200

57,450

40′ High Cube Refrigerated

2,380 cu. ft. (2,289)**

9,590

70,550

60,960


With the dimension in mind, you can have a better understanding before you start to design your own container home.


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